Breaking News

BREAKING NEWS

Supreme Court Stayed Trial Court proceedings against Nithyananda in the 2010 rape case

Nithyananda rape case trial next date: Juli 2017

Nithyananda is a NORMAL ADULT and CAPABLE (Not impotent) - says Supreme Court Ordered Medical Tests; report exposes Nithy's fake claims of being 6-years old!

Updates from Courts

UPDATES FROM COURTS

Trial court hears arguments on charge & discharge arguments for all accused. Next hearing in Trial Court on 07-07-17

Supreme Court directs Trial Court to continue with trial proceedings (arguments on charge) in Interim Order dated 7-11-2016.

Supreme Court DISMISSED ALL PETITIONS by Nithyananda and his Secretaries to Quash Charge Sheet (3rd Sep 2014)


High Court DISMISSED ALL PETITIONS by Nithyananda and his Secretaries to Quash Charge Sheet (16th Jul 2014)

NITHYANANDA FOUNDATION GUILTY OF FRAUD - US COURT ORDERED RETURN OF DONATIONS 2012

17 Retaliatory/false Complaints filed so far against whistleblower Dharmananda (lenin) by Nithyananda Cult Members!!!!

14 Retaliatory/false Complaints filed so far against victim Aarthi Rao by Nithyananda & his Cult Members!!!! (All of them after charge sheet against Nithyananda)

3 cases filed in the US against Accused 1 Nithyananda (Mr. Rajasekar), Nithyananda Foundation, Life Bliss Foundation,

4 cases filed in India against Nithyananda Dhyanapeetam for fraud:

Donors of Hyderabad Ashram, Rajapalayam Ashram,Trichy ashram and Seeragapadi Ashram (near Salem) demand that fraudulently obtained donations be returned

NITHYANANDA SLEAZE CD GENUINE : CID & FSL REPORT

Renowned Forensic Expert Padma Bhushan Prof. Dr. P. Chandra Sekharan states "video not morphed"

Nithyananda dismissed from Madurai Adheenam (on 19th Oct 2012), Nithyananda is banned from entering Madurai Adheenam mutt


Wednesday, February 22, 2012

For the lay, Nithyananda’s transcendental lies

By Chandan Nandy

It took A Rajasekharan, alias Paramahamsa Nithyananda, the man masquerading as a spiritual leader and healer of mental and physical afflictions, nearly two weeks to come out and claim that he was in a ‘trance’ when he was filmed having sex with a Tamil actress. Obviously, Nithyananda, who claims to have experienced ‘truth’ and ‘enlightenment’, is not anywhere near speaking the truth.

The ‘paramahamsa’ does not even have the courage to own up to the fact that he gave in to a moment of human weakness (it is another matter that it was not simply a momentary lapse of ascetic strength; that was his wont and the sine qua non of his so-called spiritual movement). How do we describe such a man? A fraud? A confidence trickster? A villainous manipulator? A sociopath on the loose?

The common dictionary definition of trance is “a half-conscious state, seemingly between sleeping and waking, in which ability to function voluntarily may be suspended”. If Nithyananda is trying to tell the world at large, and especially his disciples, that he was in fact violated by Ranjitha, the Tamil actress he is shown to have sex with, he is lying. For, nobody who has seen the video clips would be fooled about his claim. It is pretty much obvious that Nithyananda was not in a state of trance, or as he put it, ‘in deep samadhi’. He was, to use his own cultic language, in a state of extreme ecstatic bliss.

What Nithyananda has attempted to do through his statements aired via his own website or a couple of television news channels is to sway the flagging support among his youthful followers. The efforts to clear himself by replying to inspired questions put by a researcher of little academic recognition, the use of spurious cultic language (‘deep silent meditation’) and other forms of half-baked comments exposed an essentially flawed and devious mind incapable of taking on the truth. But these, according to sociological studies of the 1950s, also indicated that as a cult leader Nithyananda tried to change his devotees’ and television viewers’ belief systems via ‘sensory overload’ and subverting their ability to reason.

Even if it is assumed that some of the studies used over-generalised stereotypes of deception on the part of cult leaders, there is no denying the fact that Nithyananda is now employing a stratagem to trick people into believing that he committed no wrong. He has persuasion techniques, but part-admitting to have been ‘served’ by Ranjitha and lying on his state of consciousness will not go a long way to establish his credibility among the people at large. In many ways, Nithyananda has been found out. The videos ensured that first and then his statements left no doubt in the minds of the people that the man they watched on the television screen was an inveterate liar.

Credibility

Duping people by half-baked tantric concepts like being in a state of trance will only alienate his cultic order from those who are more rational in judging and concluding the moral worth of a man who claims to be, and is projected by some of his associates, as an ‘enlightened Master’.

Nithyananda was mistaken to be a charismatic leader by members of his cult. A deviant and perverse impersonation of malignity, Nithyananda tried to use the sublime ideals of Hinduism and Brahminism to achieve a rather base objective — wealth accumulation the easy way.

There is a large and established body of scholarly literature, far more credible and grounded in rationality than the mish-mash of Brahmanical and occult practices that Nithyananda bandied about through his teachings and sermons, but which are, to say the least, a perverse attack on the ideals of Brahmanism, Sanatana Dharma and Vedanta philosophy. He tried to hijack all of these in one go without even adequately comprehending them in their fullest depth. He tried to sell them expensive, the cost of which he is now paying by way of social revile.

It is best left to scholars of theology, religion and cults to ascertain what Nithyananda’s organisation, which sociologists would agree was formed to satisfy the personal interests of its leader and a few others, attempted to propagate was impairing and destructive. Nithyananda is no Moses trying to deliver his fringe flock to freedom. His seven-year movement, if it can be described as one at all, is an experiment with a self-deceiving, illusory conception of an alternative way of life that was not altruistic in the sense that it was not directed at ameliorating the lot of the poor, the marginalised, the disempowered and the wretched of society.

Nithyananda tried to engineer the beliefs of many young people that the freedom to lead wholly self-indulgent lives could provide them with the sense of purpose and direction in life they so ardently sought. Having taken the pendulum of freedom to its outermost limits, after throwing hundreds of young minds back into a regressive mode by inculcating in them the idea that he was their Master, the arbiter of their souls, and by telling them that their salvation lay at his ‘lotus feet’, Nithyananda has now found a barren vista.

http://www.deccanherald.com/content/58758/for-lay-nithyanandas-transcendental-lies.html

Sunday, February 12, 2012

Nithyananda may have forged birth documents

There is now emerging evidence suggesting that self-styled godman Nithyananda may have forged his birth documents. He has certainly misrepresented his date of birth.


The copy of the US visa issued to Nithyananda from the US Consulate in Chennai in 2003. Date of birth circled in red.Documents available with Deccan Herald show that in at least two official documents Nithyananda provided different dates of birth, bringing into question not only his age.
There are already question marks over the mechanical engineering diploma that he had supposedly earned from a Vellore polytechnic college.

A copy of the US visa issued to him from the US Consulate in Chennai in 2003 shows his date of birth to be March 13, 1977. This means that at the time of applying for the US visa, he had provided the Consulate authorities with document(s) that showed his date of birth as reflected in the travel paper stamped on his passport (No E xxxxx).

But in two other documents –– petitions filed along with sworn affidavits –– in the Karnataka High Court last week he has stated that his date of birth is January 1, 1978. In the petitions, praying for “quashing the entire proceedings including the investigation” pending against him at Bidadi police station near here, Nithyananda’s lawyer claims: “The petitioner was born on January 1, 1978, in Tiruvannamalai in Tamil Nadu.”

There is more about his age in a Nithyananda biography, relevant sections of which are available with Deccan Herald. The author writes: “Nithyananda was born on January 1, 1978, at 32 minutes past midnight in the holy town of Tiruvannamalai in South India.” The same author writes that Nithyananda was born in the Tamil month of “Margazhi” (December-January) and likens his birth to that of Krishna.

A city-based advocate Siji Malayil said furnishing two different dates of birth for official purposes could invite criminal action for cheating and forgery. Malayil added that in the case of Nithyananda, the Indian Penal Code’s Section 420 (cheating), 468 (forgery for purposes of cheating) and 471 (using as genuine a forged document) could be evoked.

In view of suspected forgery of birth documents and misrepresentation of his date of birth, the American authorities are believed to have begun to look into the manner in which Nithyananda obtained US visa. This enquiry could form the basis of a wider probe into the activities of his cult organisations that operate out of several American cities.

Incidentally, the US visa (B1/B2 type) Nithyananda obtained in 2003 was “cancelled pursuant to with prejudice” by American border officials on February 4, 2007, while he was trying to cross over from Canada to the US.

HC petition

The brief introduction of the petitioner becomes relevant and necessary herein, as follows: The petitioner was born on 1st January 1978 in Tiruvannamalai in Tamil Nadu, India and named A Rajasekaran. He is the second son of his parents (late) Sri Arunachalam and Smt Lokanayaki.


 http://www.deccanherald.com/content/59977/nithyananda-may-have-forged-birth.html

Saturday, February 11, 2012

The cult of preying and feeding on anxieties

By Chandan Nandy

The man who passed himself off as Paramahamsa Nithyananda for seven years, promised instant spirituality to hundreds, perhaps even thousands, across India and abroad.

It might be too early to brand Nithyananda as a conman, but what is emerging is that he is a psychopath who exploited people’s credulity and played on the minds of youthful devotees who, before joining his cultic order, might have demonstrated symptoms of psychic distress, anxiety, depression, apathy, disinterest, meaninglessness, isolation, social alienation and confusion. As a normative social system, Nithyananda’s cultic order is an alternative healing mechanism for the existential crises of contemporary youth.

Nithyananda, of course, is no paramahamsa. He is an ordinary man who was intelligent enough to capitalise on his youthful disciples’ loss of faith in the “rationalistic western cosmology and loss of the extended family system,” as sociologist Mansell Pattison has pointed out. But Nithyananda also tapped into the dissatisfaction caused by the impact of the prevailing economic paradigm which has created stress and anxiety, especially among those in the 30-40 age group whose members may have deliberately turned away from traditional psychotherapies toward his religious cult as the ultimate remedy for their anxieties.

These young men and women found in him and his cult — which is a strange and often frightening mix of the Vedic and tantric with an attractive and appealing focus on phallus worship — the path to physical and spiritual healing. What might also have appealed to the devotees was the stress on mental seduction and enslavement or mind control, so much so that they were prepared to abandon family, loved ones and well-wishers.

Some psychologists and sociologists agree that intensive conditioning (or brainwashing) is designed to compromise the devotees’ psychological integrity and indoctrinate them in a world view in which the ends (salvation, bliss and even personal health and wealth) justify the means (deceptive recruitment, fraudulent fund-raising and psycho-sexual practices).

The rest of Nithyananda’s so-called spiritual and healing prowess was built by aggressive and purposeful public relations directed not at the poor from our urban ghettos or despoiled rural backwaters. Rather, these are middle class, affluent, educated, and sophisticated youth. A network of branch heads in some southern Indian cities and those in the United States, mostly non-resident Indians with deep pockets helped Nithyananda catapult to spiritual stardom. It would not be out of place to point out here that the website of one of Nithyananda’s subsidiary organisations in US suggests that more than a spiritual enterprise the Nithyananda mission is commercial enterprise.

Brief interviews with some of Nithyananda’s disciples at his ashram near Bangalore and over telephone, with the primary question “what drew you to his order?,” elicited confused response. Emails from followers in support of Nithyananda were also important sources to understand what attracted the youth to his alternative spiritual system that offered a radical world view in distinction from the common culture, with explicit sanctions in regard to one’s behaviour, with a strong emphasis on separatism from the ‘world at large’ that is reflected in some degree of small group communality ranging from total communal living to frequent communal gatherings.

Beliefs

The standard replies typically comprised two strains of belief: a) he helped heal their physical ailments and psychological distress and b) we experienced truth and enlightenment, two very abstract concepts that souls far greater and intellectual than ‘Nithyananda, our Master’ have not been able to fathom within the context of Indian philosophy.

The likes of sundry other self-proclaimed television-propelled godmen have, in their own distinctive styles, tried to peddle Indian spirituality, with their base and esoteric twists, to a gullible audience within India and abroad.

They have met with varied levels of successes and then faded away as the spiritual ferment, shaped in large part by globalisation and television, spawned other unconventional, secretive and deviant cult movements. They were sought to be given legitimacy and acceptability within society by obtaining the crucial backing of political parties and enlisting the support of the rich and the powerful, an approach that has almost always benefited the organisations in more ways than one.

But such groups have often elicited extreme hostility and distrust and have, moreover, been perceived as fundamentally subversive of civil order and the ideals of Hinduism. To some extent, part of the popular uproar about cult groups such as Nithyananda’s comes from bewildered, frightened and angry parents and other elders who cannot comprehend why the youth, otherwise socialised into the mainstream of society with many seeming advantages, should abandon their cultural and religious heritage to enter such ‘separate reality.’

The Nithyananda cult operated as a surrogate extended family and provided novel, if questionable, therapeutic and spiritual alternatives that confer meaning on individual lives and experiences, even if the devotees were deluded into believing so because of their existential vacuum. In doing so, he and some of his close confidantes exploited the weaknesses of existing institutions like Hinduism, family and modern psychiatry.

This is not to say that cults necessarily threaten the social order. After all, people are at liberty to exercise their preference for one religious movement for another. But what may endanger society is the return to obscurantism, superstition and blind faith that once constituted the bane of India.

A study of Nithyananda’s cultic order — the reference to an ‘energised banyan tree’ and ‘energised puja items,’ besides a host of weird teaching practices that go toward deification of the occult — indicates that its devotees, drunk on their ‘sadguru,’ their ‘Enlightened Master’ of merely seven years’ experience, should exercise some caution in distinguishing between the truly pious and the charlatan.

http://www.deccanherald.com/content/57807/cult-preying-feeding-anxieties.html